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A Response to "Copying vs. Stealing"

I just discovered an article on the IPCA's website, written by Kerrie Venner, VP for Education and Outreach. Kerrie's article is here.

The article talked about my artwork and a blog article I wrote about my work being copied. Kerrie refers to me as an example of an artist who has published directions for making my artwork who then gets "antsy" when people copy it. She states that she doesn't understand what's wrong with coveting my little totem animals, then making her own versions for her own use, and even to sell, since her customers probably aren't familiar with my work anyway.

At first I was delighted to read Kerrie's wonderful comments about my blog and my artwork. But that delight quickly turned to dismay.

Her article is an interesting take on a very complex and emotional issue.

Just to correct a few errors:

  1. Kerrie's article simply linked to the home page of my blog. My article Kerrie that refers to in her article is WHAT IS THE STORY ONLY YOU CAN TELL? and the correct url is http://luannudell.wordpress.com/2010/05/30/what-is-the-story-only-you-can-tell/ I discuss why someone who copies another artist's work is actually short-changing their own creative journey.
  2. Contrary to Kerrie's assertions, I've actually only published directions featuring my faux ivory technique (a modification of the technique originally developed by Victoria Hughes.) I provided directions for very simple beads, buttons and bones. Photographs of my animal artifacts and jewelry were for illustration and inspiration only.
  3. I have never published projects or taught how to make my artifacts and animal totems, for the very reasons Kerrie mentions in support of her viewpoint: It might imply permission for others to copy my work.

I could address each of Kerrie's statements and questions separately, and will do so in a future blog article. But here's the short story:

I've done the hard work creating this body of work. I spent years perfecting my craft. Inspired by imagery available to everyone, it is nonetheless a highly original and individual interpretation and presentation. As Kerrie points out, it has a powerful, personal narrative, describing my journey from a place of pain (at not practicing my art), to a place of healing (embracing my unique vision, and sharing with others how that happened.)

I've done the hard work to get my work out there. And I've spent a lot of money doing that. I've paid thousands of dollars to do the high-end shows to sell it. I go to great lengths to find galleries to carry it. I've spent thousands of hours marketing, writing, speaking, entering exhibits and juried shows, and submitting work for publication to support and grow my reputation. I've paid thousands of dollars to have my work professionally photographed, to construct a booth and create beautiful displays for it.

I've spent years developing a loyal following of customers, collectors and supporters. I am deeply moved by the role my art has played in their lives. I love the stories they share with me on how much my work has meant to them, how much it has inspired them, how it has healed them.

I've earned my stars and paid my dues. My work-and my prices--reflect that.

We artists may make our art for love or money, or both. But it's hard to make art without some kind of support from our community, be it emotional, spiritual, or financial.

Kerrie says she admires and desires my artwork. I am truly grateful for that. There are many ways a true supporter can help me get my art out into the world:

1) Tell me how much it means to you, and respect the unique place in my heart it comes from. Tell your friends, too, and point them to my blog, my website or my store.

2) Spread the word about my work by writing great reviews and articles.

3) Buy it for yourself, or for a special gift.

4) If you really can't afford my work (prices start at $42, and I have a great layaway plan), encourage potential collectors to buy it instead. Or ask friends and family to buy it for you. Christmas is coming!

5) Ask your favorite gallery or museum store to carry my work. Or suggest they include me in an invitational show. Or even a solo show

Actually, the list is endless: Invite me to speak to your local or regional art guild. Ask your public library to purchase the books that feature my work. Hire me for a private consult on your artist statement. Alert me to publishing opportunities. Etc., etc., etc.

Unfortunately, copying my work doesn't support me.

Copying my work, then selling it as your original work, deprives me of potential customers who might buy my work. This does not support me.

Telling others I am wrong to care about my work being copied does not support me.

In fact, someone copying my artwork short-circuits everything I'm trying to achieve. That is where the pain and the resentment comes from. And that is what I have to get over, and get through, every time it happens.

In the end, although my work is copyrighted, it's almost impossible for me to protect those rights. I don't have the deep pockets of Disney, and I don't have the time or emotional energy to spare. I have to save that energy and focus for my art.

Some amount of copying has its place in the learning process. That's why a teacher provides a project for a class.

But a body of work based solely on some "variation" of someone else's work is not the work of your own heart, your own unique vision.

Kerrie's article was written without my knowledge and did not link to what I actually said. I cannot adequately convey how disheartening it is to see these views-justifying the right to copying my work simply because I have made it visible in the world--expressed by someone who is Vice President of the International Polymer Clay Association's Education and Outreach Committee.

Kerrie is entitled to her viewpoint, and I appreciate the opportunity to present mine. As she and I both said, this is a complex issue, involving human nature, the creative process and ethics.

Whether or not Kerrie's reflects the views of the IPCA organization, it was published on their site and incorrectly referred to me as an example of a disgruntled artist who sets herself up for being copied by offering her artwork as projects and classes. Since I'm not one of "those artists"--who are also entitled to their own opinions about others copying their work--and especially because I have consciously chosen not to...that allegation was neither true nor fair.

I'm thrilled Kerrie loves my work. I hope someday she decides my artwork is worthy of collecting for herself. I would be truly honored.

And...I would feel truly supported.

 

Related articles:

“Copying vs. Stealing”  by Kerrie Venner

pdf Nan Roche Article on Copying from 1998 PolyInFormer

 

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